Are North Korean (Cuban) "Laws" Legitimate?

Thursday, March 24, 2011
Of course not.

Here's a great article for those that keep repeating the same nonsense about American development worker Alan Gross violating Cuban "law" (by helping Cubans connect to the Internet).

Tyrannical regimes -- whether Libya, North Korea or Cuba -- are not ruled by laws, they are ruled by arbitrary, dictatorial decrees.

As Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states:

"Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers."

In other words, information is a universal human right, which under any interpretation of international law trumps dictatorial decrees.

From Robert S. Boynton in The Atlantic:

North Korea's Digital Underground

To smuggle facts into or out of North Korea is to risk imprisonment and even execution. Yet today, aided by a half-dozen stealthy media organizations outside the country, citizen-journalists are using technologies new and old to break the regime's iron grip on information. Will the truth set a nation free?

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea is the very archetype of a "closed society." It ranks dead last—196th out of 196 countries—in Freedom House's Freedom of the Press index. Unlike the citizens of, say, Tunisia or Egypt, to name two countries whose populations recently tapped the power of social media to help upend the existing political order, few North Koreans have access to Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. In fact, except for a tiny elite, the DPRK's 25 million inhabitants are not connected to the Internet. Televisions are set to receive only government stations. International radio signals are routinely jammed, and electricity is unreliable. Freestanding radios are illegal. But every North Korean household and business is outfitted with a government-controlled radio hardwired to a central station. The speaker comes with a volume control, but no off switch. In a new media age awash in universally shared information—an age of planet-wide instant messaging and texted manifestos—the Democratic People's Republic of Korea remains a stubborn holdout, a regime almost totally in control of its national narrative.

Given this isolation, it's even more remarkable that since 2004, a half-dozen independent media organizations have been launched in Northeast Asia to communicate with North Koreans—to bring news out of the country as well as to get potentially destabilizing information in. These media insurgents have a two-pronged strategy, integrating Cold War methods (Voice of America–like shortwave broadcasts in; samizdat-like info out) and 21st-century hardware: SD chips, thumb drives, CDs, e-books, miniature recording devices, and cell phones. And as with all intelligence-gathering projects, their most valuable assets are human: a network of reporters in North Korea and China who dispatch a stream of reports, whether about the palace intrigue surrounding the choice of Kim Jong Il's successor, or the price of flour in W┼Ćnsan.

Read the whole article here.

H/T Penultimos Dias.