French News Agency Omits Castro's Larceny

Tuesday, June 25, 2013
The AFP, which stands for Agence France-Presse, has run a story regarding a dispute between the European Union and the U.S. over a trademark law "affecting the rum business."

The story explains how, "the battle centers on a 1998 law which allows a US brand of rum to use the 'Havana Club' name despite it already being owned by a company based in Cuba, which is in business with France's Pernod Ricard group."

Moreover that, "the 1998 law banned Havana Club Holdings, a joint venture between Pernod Ricard and Havana Rum and Liquors of Cuba, which owns the Havana Club trademark, forcing it to defend its business in US courts against the Bacardi-Martini group."

Doesn't that sound nice?

Now here's what the AFP conveniently omits, in order to cover the predatory actions of its fellow Frenchmen at Pernod Ricard.

The trademark law in question simply prohibits the recognition of stolen brands in the U.S.

The Havana Club brand was stolen, without compensation, from its rightful owners by the Castro regime in 1959.

The Castro regime then took the stolen brand and illegally sold it to France's Pernod Ricard, which apparently has no problem trafficking in stolen property.

As such, the U.S. does not recognize the Castro regime or Pernod Ricard as the rightful owners of the brand Havana Club.

Larceny is a terrible thing to omit.