A Pro-Castro Soiree

Sunday, March 16, 2014
Yesterday, a pro-Castro group organized a forum of 100 people in Miami urging the normalization of relations with the Cuban dictatorship.

We don't use that term lightly. The organizers are from a group that has viciously attacked Cuban blogger Yoani Sanchez; poked fun of dissidents on hunger strikes; and features a "former" intelligence official (whose cousin runs Raul Castro's main business conglomerate).

They even invited Castro regime officials to participate.

In other words, the organizers aren't reasonable anti-Castro, yet anti-sanctions, activists. These folks are in a whole other stratosphere.

Of course, you probably won't read that in the media.

Instead, the headlines ambiguously read, "Cuban Americans hold rare meeting to discuss normalizing Cuba relations."

Or, "Supporters of stronger US relations with Cuba stage rare gathering in Miami."

Perhaps they are "rare" because they are running out of steam -- even the anti-Castro, anti-sanctions ones. 

Remember the "historic" National Summits on Cuba, which in 2003 bragged about gathering over 400 people in Miami?

Yesterday's forum is like the JV squad of those "groundbreaking" summits that fizzled out.

Or when The Miami Herald wrote about another forum in 2002 (hosted by another group that fizzled out):

"It was billed as a 'historic' event to propel a change of U.S. policy toward Cuba. About 300 people attended a daylong conference Thursday calling for a lifting of the 43-year-old embargo and easing of trade and travel restrictions.

Although some groups have advocated a change in policy for years, it was believed to be the first time that a significant conference opposing the U.S. embargo of Cuba was held in Miami-Dade County."

Or when Alejandro Portes, an "expert" on Cuban-American politics wrote in 2001:

"[A]nother congressional initiative to lift the embargo... is being actively promoted by emerging Miami-based Cuban-American organizations, such as the Cuban Committee for Democracy (CCD) and Cambio Cubano (Cuban Change). These groups are forcefully conveying to Congress that moderates in the exile community are ready to end the vengeful rigidity of past policies."

They too fizzled out.

We've seen (and heard) it all before.