Where's the Outrage? Why the Double-Standard? Who's the Leaker?

Sunday, April 6, 2014
It's been fascinating to watch some of the media's outrage toward a successful effort to provide the Cuban people with a social media platform ("Cuban Twitter") to freely communicate with each other.

It's been a top-news story in many outlets -- mostly with the AP's spin.

Yet, why's there not similar outrage regarding the Castro regime's violations of Internet freedom?

Why's there not similar outrage regarding the weekly harassment, arrest and beating of peaceful Cuban women, The Ladies in White, as they try to attend Sunday Mass?

Why's there not similar outrage regarding the rise in political repression under Raul Castro, averaging over 1,000 political arrests per month?

Why's there not similar outrage regarding the recent mysterious deaths of Cuban democracy leaders?

Why's there not similar outrage regarding the Castro regime's subversion of democratic institutions in Venezuela?

Why's there not similar outrage regarding the Castro regime's smuggling of weapons to North Korea, the largest interdiction of weapons to the Kim regime, in violation of international sanctions?

Why's there not similar outrage regarding the Castro regime's "new" foreign investment law, which blatantly violates international labor law?

Why's there not similar outrage to the Castro regime's holding of an American hostage, Alan Gross, since December 2009?

Why's there not similar outrage to the beating, arrest and murder of young Venezuelans by the Castro-influenced Maduro government?

Why's there not similar outrage regarding Internet freedom efforts to help civil society in Syria, Iran, Belarus, Burma, North Korea, etc.?

Needless to say, no one has bothered pointing out that efforts to help Cubans connect independently to social media wouldn't be necessary if they weren't ruled by a totalitarian dictatorship.

With Bloomberg's exception, no one has bothered pointing out that the "Cuban Twitter" program ended because it was so successful, so fast. Thus, demonstrating the hunger of the Cuban people to communicate freely and independently.

Finally, why is no one asking who leaked the details of the "Cuban Twitter" program to the AP?

The details of these programs are discreet because any effort to help civil society in Cuba or any other totalitarian regime can potentially endanger lives. The answer is not sitting with our arms crossed in the face of repression, but working cautiously to break the information blockade of these regimes.

Thus, it should be investigated who leaked the details, why and whether such a leak was illegal.