Cuba's Regime Can't Be Trusted on Terrorism

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
Among the statutory criteria stipulated under Section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act (as currently re-authorized under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act) for removing Cuba from the State Department's "state-sponsors of terrorism" list is:

That Cuba provides “assurances” that it will not support acts of international terrorism in the future.

(For an in-depth analysis of all the criteria, click here.  Note the referenced analysis was written before Cuba's regime got caught red-handed smuggling weapons to North Korea last summer, and the arming and training of Venezuela's paramilitary "colectivos" became fully evident this winter.)

Last week, in response to its retention on the 2013 "state-sponsors of terrorism" list, the Castro regime stated:

"The Government of Cuba ratifies that its national territory has never been used and never will be to harbor terrorists of any origin, nor to organize, finance or perpetrate acts of terrorism against any country in the world, including the United States."

That's quite a whopper.

Just ask Castro's favorite pupil, Carlos "the Jackal" -- or ETA, FARC, ELN, PLO, M-19, Medellin Cartel, Montoneros, Macheteros, FLN, EGP, MIR, IRA, FALN, NLF, MRTA or PFLP, just to name a few of the international terrorist groups trained, financed and abetted by the Cuban regime.

Thus, how can the U.S. even consider accepting "assurances" on terrorism from a regime that falsely [and absurdly] claims it has never supported terrorism in the first place?

That makes any such "assurances" automatically worthless and untrustworthy.

The U.S. made that obvious mistake once in recent years -- courtesy of the Bush Administration with North Korea.

Note how well that turned out.