What Was the "Cuba-Bound" Weapons Ship Delivering to Colombia?

Monday, April 27, 2015
Excerpt by Mary O'Grady in The Wall Street Journal:

Devilish Dealmaking in Colombia

The FARC terrorists repay President Santos’s peace negotiations by executing 11 soldiers.

The predawn execution of 11 Colombian soldiers in the province of Cauca by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) on April 15 is shaping up as a defining moment for President Juan Manuel Santos. Mr. Santos has staked his presidency on peace negotiations with the FARC. But the talks, now in their fourth year, have polarized a nation that was once united against the rebels.

With the massacre in Cauca, the divide has deepened, and simmering public resentment of what some see as their commander in chief’s deference to the guerrillas has exploded. At a Bogotá road race to honor fallen military heroes days after the killings, the president faced a barrage of jeering and booing.

Days later the government denied rumors that Mr. Santos will now seek special powers, via a referendum, to negotiate and seal a deal without congressional or public review. Colombians I talked to expect the president to try just that, noting that he is running low on time and credibility.

Mr. Santos didn’t help last week when he released a Chinese ship carrying an undeclared weapons cache, which had been seized in Cartagena in early March. The Da Dan Xia’s bill of lading claimed it was carrying grain. But according to press reports Colombian authorities found 100 tons of gunpowder, 2.6 million detonators for bullets, 99 “projectiles” (rocket-propelled grenades, to venture a guess) and 3,000 artillery shells—in other words, the stuff of guerrilla warfare.

Once freed, the floating armory went to Cuba, which according to China had ordered the low-tech hardware. But then why the false documentation and why won’t the Colombian government say what the ship was delivering to Colombia?

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