Fact: Since December 17th, U.S. Agricultural Sales to Cuba Plummet

Tuesday, June 23, 2015
Facts are stubborn -- and sobering.

For years we've heard how an improvement in U.S.-Cuba relations, an easing of sanctions and an increase in travel to the island, would benefit U.S. farmers.

Well, since December 17th, the Obama Administration has embraced the Castro regime -- offering it every concession it can deliver.

As part of these concessions, the Obama Administration eased payment terms for agricultural sales.

As a result of these concessions, American travel to Cuba has increased by a reported 37%.

And this week, the Castro regime announced that its GDP had grown by over 4% during the first six months of 2015 -- thanks to growth in its sugar, trade and tourism monopolies.

Oh, and not to mention the endless U.S. business and trade delegations to Havana.

Yet, as The Washington Post reported last week:

"[I]n the six months since President Obama announced a new opening to the island, sales of U.S. foodstuffs — among the few U.S. products allowed, with restrictions, under the embargo — have dropped by half, from $160 million in the first quarter of 2014, to $83 million this year."

How could that be?

Simple.

The biggest lesson the Castro regime has learned from the Obama Administration is that it has more to gain from coercion than from good-will or behavior.

Thus, cut purchases dramatically, and watch the lobbying for financing, mass tourism and investment for Castro's monopolies intensify.

As we've written before, a policy based on coercion is never in the U.S.'s best (political or economic) interest.